Rubio and Scott, too, may find that independent-minded voters will look harshly on senators who vote to place this president above the Constitution or the American people’s interest.

There seems little mystery how Florida’s senators will vote if the question of subpoenaing witnesses and documents is reopened during the impeachment proceedings. So far, they have marched in the same lockstep as their party peers in rejecting every motion by Democrats to do that.


Did the Florida senators mean it when they took that special oath to act as impartial jurors in the impeachment trial of President Donald J. Trump?


Rubio did state in a recent op-ed that the trial will be “open and even-handed ... serious and straightforward” — but in the next breath accused House Democrats of making a “mockery of the impeachment process” with “partisan theatrics.”


Rick Scott never made any pretense of independence from Trump. “House Democrats proved that @realDonaldTrump did nothing wrong. It’s time to end this circus and get back to work for the American people,” Scott tweeted the day before he raised his right hand and took that oath of impartiality.


On Wednesday, Scott told CNN’s Dana Bash that he would “absolutely” be open to witnesses, including former National Security Adviser John Bolton, but quickly added that “we would have to go through the right process” and blamed the House for not calling Bolton to testify (in fact, House Democrats did request testimony and documents from Bolton; they didn’t issue a subpoena).


We translate this to mean: “We’re not going to do the House’s work for them.”


But the question remains: Do the senators wish to be part of a trial that genuinely seeks to get to the truth for the American people?


Over and over, Trump’s Republican defenders have derided the House Democrats’ impeachment case as thin because it contains no testimony from first-hand witnesses.


Now the Senate has the chance to hear from those first-hand participants — including Bolton, who has offered to testify. But instead, the Republicans have huddled with the White House to keep as much information under wraps as possible.


They’re not just protecting Trump. They’re keeping the American people in the dark.


We should ask why.


Take the case of Bolton. He knows as much as anyone about what happened during the Ukraine affair. Democrats want him to testify — even though they can’t be sure of what he would say. For all they know, Bolton’s answers might backfire on them and help Trump. Still, the Democrats are willing to take the risk.


Republicans, however, look afraid — and voters should take note.


Similarly, Gov. Ron DeSantis wants the public to know nothing about his ties to Lev Parnas, the erratic Boca Raton businessman turned Rudy Giuliani fixer in Ukraine.


But running away from questions won’t end them. And the governor may find that the taint of Trump’s impeachment may attach to him unless he gives a full accounting of his dealings with this key figure in the Ukraine scandal.


Rubio and Scott, too, may find that independent-minded voters will look harshly on senators who vote to place this president above the Constitution or the American people’s interest.


A longer version of this editorial appeared in The Palm Beach Post.