Bret Stephens' June 5 column in The Register-Guard did a good job of explaining the consequences of the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act. It was a major cause of the Depression of the 1930s, and President Trump’s recent tariffs against our friends such as Canada may have a similar effect.

However, readers of The R-G need to think about the price supports used by the Canadian government on its timber exports to Oregon. These price supports make it harder for lumber producers here in Oregon. The U.S. and Canada are in negotiations under NAFTA, and I'm sure that the Canadian price supports are an item which is being brought up by the U.S. negotiators.

If the U.S. were to be successful, contractors are likely to use more U.S. lumber. That's good for people in Oregon who harvest or sell lumber. However, if the contractors who build homes have to pay more for their lumber, the price for new homes will rise.

It's important to look at the import of tariffs, or their reduction, on both producers and consumers.

G. Dennis Shine, Springfield