Seahawks sink St. Joe, no Sweatt

Carza Harvey

The Seahawks lifted Carza Harvey high in the air after the final buzzer.

DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
Published: Thursday, December 27, 2012 at 11:00 AM.

Last week, on Friday night in Eastpoint, the Seahawks basketball team was hungry for more than Christmas dinner.

Because he drew a pair of technical fouls two Fridays ago at South Walton, Franklin County High School Coach Mike Sweatt had been fined and drew a heavy suspension, or was what assistant coach Jeremy Williams called “wrongfully suspended,” for six weeks by the Florida High School Athletic Association - an action that, unless overturned and so far it has not been, will mean Sweatt can only conduct practices and make no appearances at any games until the end of the regular season.

The Seahawks’ appetites were whet because their bellies lacked anything resembling a lavish meal of victories so far this season, a mere two wins in their first 10 games, and neither of them in the district.

They were hungry, yes, but still Williams had concerns the Seahawks would do as they’ve done before: Build a lead, fail to hold it, then struggle, unsuccessfully, to get it back.

“We’ve been having a bad habit of letting teams come back on us,” said Williams, an Apalachicola Shark player under coach Joe Hayes who graduated in 2005. “This time we performed in the clutch.”

Lady Seahawk coach Carlos Hill sat quietly on the far end of the bench the entire game, didn’t get involved, so Williams’ first win as a varsity coach was entirely his own. And with Sweatt out of pocket, because a ref thought he complained too much about the officiating, the Seahawks head coach had to learn of the win right after it happened, since his players insisted he be the first they called.

Here’s what took place Friday night at Franklin County High School.



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