Hundreds flock to 2013 Estuary Day

Tenth grader Chase Taranto explains an ongoing class experiment exploring which surface is best for Photo available for purchase

Tenth grader Chase Taranto explains an ongoing class experiment exploring which surface is best for raising oysters in the bay. Oyster shell has produced the biggest and best shellfish in the past, but this year the population has dropped on all surfaces, he said.

Lois Swoboda
Published: Thursday, October 3, 2013 at 08:55 AM.

The weather was perfect Friday afternoon, as the schools closed early and more than 700 people attended Estuary Day 2013, held at Marion Millender Park and the adjacent interpretive and research center for the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve.

In all, 73 people, 28 staff and 45 volunteers manned the exhibits. Volunteers came from Franklin County High School and the ABC School, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Dr. Julian Bruce St. George Island State Park, the Florida State University Coastal and Marine Lab and numerous other organizations.

New this year was an exhibit on honey staffed by local beekeepers George Watkins and Jimmy Moses. Another first was a booth from the culinary students at the Franklin County School, which served up “sea shell salad,” wraps and sweet treats for a very modest fee.

Organizer Lisa Bailey said the crowd was up by about 100 from last year.

Rumor has it that one young attendee failed to follow directions and wound up in one of the specimen tanks, but no name could be confirmed. Bailey said the youngster was unharmed. She said the fall was result of horseplay despite the fact that he was accompanied by a parent

“Sounds like natural consequences to me!” she said.



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