Franklin’s new deepwater challenge

The geocache is an underwater slate

The geocache is an underwater slate

Lynda Tiefel | Special to the Times
Published: Wednesday, July 23, 2014 at 09:58 AM.

Lynda Tiefel of Tallahassee has two passions. She loves to geocache and adores scuba diving.

Last month, she combined her two favorite activities when she hid a new geocache entitled “You are going to need a bigger boat.”

For those not in the know, geocaching, which combines the terms "geographical" and "cache," is an outdoor adventure that sends seekers on a treasure hunt for containers of trinkets and prizes. Participants use a Global Positioning System receiver (GPSr) to hide and seek containers called "geocaches" or "caches." A typical cache is a waterproof container containing a logbook and pen, but caches can be as simple as a strip of magnetic plastic with a sheet of paper attached or a small roll of paper in a tiny waterproof tube.

Searchers frequently choose geocaches to hunt by typing a zip code into a search engine provided by Groundspeak, the organization that coordinates deployment of geocaches worldwide. They then use a handheld GPSr or cell phone app to locate the actual cache and sign the log. After hunting a cache, they report on the adventure online at the Groundspeak website.

Tiefel, whose geocaching name is DiverRN, has hidden a plastic slate on an artificial reef 10 miles south of Dog Island in 60-feet of water at N 29° 39.161 W 084° 30.008. Divers who locate the slate will sign it using an ordinary pencil.

The cache was hidden with the blessing of the Organization for Artificial Reefs (OAR), which placed the concrete reef unit on the sea floor. Tiefel sits on the board of OAR and is currently president of the Tallahassee Area Geocachers (TAG).

The reef where the geocache is hidden was deployed in June in memory of Dixon Camp. It has three "super reefs" each 15 feet high with a regular-sized artificial reef module inside.



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