Immediately following 9/11, I cringed every time I heard a plane fly overhead and prayed for our nation’s survival.

That frightful event’s only bright spot was that it brought our nation together – for a short while. Since then, it seems we are increasingly fighting among ourselves. But are we truly enemies?

Lately, it seems that thin skin is quite in vogue, especially regarding politics – and sadly, even among Facebook friends. Why are we so divided? Is this divisiveness a byproduct of terror, causing us to turn on each other?

Starting with our families, churches and communities, we can rise above this distrust and hatred.

We can begin by finding ways to serve, even if while serving, we happen to help those we disagree with.

Perhaps God will lead us to give money or look for opportunities to help those who suffered property damage from the recent hurricane, those affected by the fires in California or the flood victims in Louisiana.

After all, would people who are trapped in a flooded house really ask about the rescuer’s political affiliation before accepting help? Or would parents whose infant child was saved from a burning home reject a hero’s kindness just because he was in favor of closing the borders? And considering the hot and humid climate in the South, wouldn’t people welcome shelter in an air-conditioned place, even though the one who was running the shelter posted a campaign sign in favor of the “wrong” candidate?

“Scriptures tell us that if you see your enemy hungry, go buy that person lunch, or if he’s thirsty, get him a drink. Your generosity will surprise him with goodness. Don’t let evil get the best of you; get the best of evil by doing good” (Romans 12:20-21The Message).

Doesn’t that say it well?

How would our country change if each of us strove to do good more often?

The United States is only 240 years old. We must unite again as a nation if we are to survive. And frankly, we might need each other even more in the future.

Sheryl H. Boldt is the author of a new blog, www.TodayCanBeDifferent.net. You can email Sheryl at sherylhboldt@gmail.com.