Health department to celebrate today



You are cordially invited to celebrate 125 years of public health in Florida today by visiting a clinic near you.



The Florida Department of Health will host the celebration on Thursday, Feb. 20 from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Carrabelle Clinic, at 106 North Fifth Street, and from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Apalachicola Clinic, at 139-12th Street .



For more information please contact Gina Moore, Department of Health in Franklin County 653-2111 Ext. 123



‘Flags of Our Fathers’ at museum Saturday



This Saturday, Feb. 22 at 10:15 a.m., “Flags of Our Fathers,” directed by Clint Eastwood, will be shown at the Camp Gordon Johnston Museum in Carrabelle. The plot focuses on seven United States Marines of the 28th Marine Regiment, 5th Marine Division - Sgt. Mike Strank, Pfc. Rene Gagnon, Pfc. Ira Hayes, Cpl. Harlon Block, Pfc. Franklin Sousley, Sgt. Hank Hansen, and Pfc. Ralph Ignatowski – as well as their Navy corpsman, PhM2 John “Doc” Bradley.



Eastwood was 14 when the Battle of Iwo Jima took place in 1945, old enough to know how Joe Rosenthal’s famous picture vouched for victory with the raising of the second flag atop Mt. Surabachi.



This battle commenced on Feb. 19, 1945 and was one of the costliest of the Pacific Campaign. Due to the graphic scenes of violence shown in this film, absolutely no one under the age of 18 will be allowed to view this film.



Perhaps this film best demonstrates what our Army, Navy, and Marine veterans faced while in combat in the Pacific. This film will last a little over two hours and free popcorn will be provided. While there is no admission fee, please remember the museum operates on donations, and donations are welcome.



Community drumming Sunday in Apalachicola



Community Drumming in Apalachicola will be this Sunday, Feb. 23 from 3 to 4 p.m. at Water Street Gardens Shop, at Commerce and Water streets. This drumming workshop/circle is hand drumming with African djembes provided, with learning technique, drum exercises and rhythms played together. Cost for participation is $15 for workshop, facilitated by Mershell Sherman, more than 20 years as a percussionist. Beginners welcome. Drumming benefits mind, body and spirit.



Artist to demonstrate ‘encaustic’ painting



On Thursday, Feb. 27, Denise Callaghan will give a demonstration of "encaustic" painting which will utilize hot beeswax with pigment and sometimes includes collage elements found items to be incorporated into the painting.



This is part of an outreach by the Carrabelle Artists Association at the Carrabelle City Complex from 6 to 8 p.m. every other Thursday evening. Artists and interested people are invited to watch and/or participate in the free presentation. Artists are welcomed to work on other projects.



Callaghan will be giving a similar free demonstration on Saturday, March 8 for the Coastal Art Tour in the Carrabelle Area. For questions call 850-294-9664850-294-9664.



Carrabelle artists plan art tour March 7-8



The Carrabelle Artists Association is presenting its fourth annual Coastal Art Tour in conjunction with Camp Gordon Johnston Days. Various art exhibits and demonstrations will be presented at participating galleries, studios, and shops Saturday, March 8, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.



On Friday evening, March 7, from 7 to 9 p.m., a reception with live music will be held at the Rio Carrabelle (corner of Hwy 98 & Tallahassee St.) where maps may be obtained. 



From Carrabelle Beach to St James, more than 20 artists at multiple locations will be participating and demonstrating fine art, portrait drawing, sculpture, pottery and photography. Maps and information available at the Carrabelle Chamber of Commerce, Carrabelle City Hall, the Franklin County Senior Center and each participating location. Also on Facebook at Carrabelle Artist Association



For information on this event call Bill Owen at 653-6426 or email at billowen@wildblue.net



Physicians must provide medical records



According to McKinley Lewis, a public information specialist with the Florida Department of Health, state law requires physicians to provide patients with non-psychiatric records upon request.



The law also requires physicians to make arrangements for patients to obtain their records when the physician terminates practice. Disciplinary action can be taken against a physician's license if they do not comply with these requirements. 



“In most cases, the Department of Health will try to mediate these cases prior to initiating an investigation in an effort to get records to the patient as quickly as possible,” Lewis said.



He said that if patients are having difficulty getting their records from Dr. Stephen Miniat, or any other former or current Franklin County physician, they should contact the Consumer Services Unit at (850) 245-4339(850) 245-4339 and ask for the Ombudsman.



Gas tax provides $1.6 million for construction



At the Feb. 4 county commission meeting, County Planner Alan Pierce reported on funds available in the local gas tax fund.



He said there will be approximately $1.6 million in construction funds available, or approximately $325,000 per district by Sept. 30. He said milled asphalt from CW Roberts is currently $350 per truckload delivered to the county yard on State Route 65. A truckload is approximately 18 tons, or 18 cubic yards.



Extension may move to Scipio Creek



On Feb. 4, County Planner Alan Pierce told county commissioners that he, Dr. Pete Vergot and other University of Florida personnel discussed on Jan. 30 the possible relocation and expansion of the UF Extension Office.



The current idea is to relocate the county extension office out of the Armory and into the old Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve (ANERR) building at Scipio Creek. The University of Florida would also then locate a lab and other programs and services into that building. The lab would provide services associated with one of several oyster re-shelling programs that will soon be started in the Apalachicola Bay.



The city of Apalachicola owns the land and there is a reverter clause that if the building ceases to used by ANERR, the property will revert back to the city. Pierce said UF officials believe that if the city allows the university to set up an educational program in the building, the federal government will let it revert back to the city.



 



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